Friday, April 4, 2014

Miso-Glazed Black Cod – Nobu for You

This is my take on the oft requested miso-glazed, black cod, made famous by chef Nobu Matsuhisa, although I will be improving on the master’s world-famous preparation. 

Okay, that was a joke, but my version does have a major difference; I only like to marinate the fish for a short time, as opposed to the more traditional one or two days.

I’ve had it both ways, and both are fantastic, but black cod is so sweet and succulent, that I prefer the less-marinated approach. The glaze is so flavorful that waiting two days to eat seems unnecessary. This will work on any similarly sized chunk of fish, but seriously, try to find some black cod. It’s also known as butterfish, and for very good reason. It’s like butter.

In addition to a taste and texture to die for, this is one of the easiest fish recipes of all time. A couple minutes to make the sauce, some brushing, a short wait, and you’re broiling. By the way, I don’t like to cook both sides. I like the heat to only penetrate from the top down. This makes for a lovely caramelized top, and a super juicy interior. Cooking times will vary, but simply broil the fish until the bones pull out with no effort, and the meat flakes. I really hope you give this a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for 2 Portions:
2 black cod filet (about 7 oz each)
2 tbsp water
3 tbsp white miso
2 tbsp mirin
2 tbsp sake
1 tbsp brown sugar

21 comments:

inchrisin said...

Sir John:
The recipe looks great. I think you should mention what kind of sake you used, as the styles varies as much as wine or beer. Thanks! :)

Mike said...

So cool to see my food wish come true. Thanks a lot!

Tony Arra said...

Can you eat the bones for calcium?

Spencer Jackson said...

Hey Chef,

Its called white miso because it uses white soybeans. AT least that's what my Japanese mother in law tells me.

sejin lee said...

I suck on the spine and chew on the bones of korean braised black cod with radish dish. It is my favorite fish.

Sarah said...

Thanks chef, this was my food wish I didn't even know about! Going to make it soon. I kind of miss some sauce to go with it. Would the miso glaze thinned with water and soy sauce work?

Moggy Kubota said...

I've always heard that its called white miso because its fermented with a higher percentage of white rice than the darker red miso is.

This fish looks delish ~ I'm bummed that I have a huge container of miso in the fridge, but it is red miso, so I guess it would be too overpowering to use for this recipe?

Jennifer said...

Hi Chef,

If I want a crispy skin without losing the caramelized top, could I put it into a frying pan, skin-side down? Should I do this after the broiler or before the broiler?

Hannah Lee said...

I just tried this recipe and O.M.G. you were completely right (not that I doubt your culinary skills. Unless I do). that is one sexy piece of fish and incredible moist (and easy) to make! Served mine with some sauteed Yu Choy and sugar snap peas that I just happen to have. Delish~

Chef John said...

Jen, You'd have to do before, but don't think it would stay crispy once flipped.

Ian Ng said...

Guys, whenever I cook big pieces of fish water seeps out when it is plated. Is it just me?

Michał Łaszczyk said...

With what other ingredients can I replace sake and mirin? i.e. vodka and light white wine?

Andrew Schlachter said...

This may be a stupid question; but is black cod the same as alaskan cod?

Chef John said...

Sorry, but I think Alaskan cod just means it comes from there, not a variety. But not sure!

Chef John said...

Michal, white wine works for sake, but mirin nothing like vodka! Not sure what else is.

A. Ali said...

Hello Chef,

Great recipe and the final product looks delicious!! Quick question, since I don't consume alcohol, what can I substitute in it's place?

Thanks!!

Carissa Ritchey said...

After having Miso Black Cod at David LeFevre's Fishing with Dynamite here in Manhattan Beach -- not Nobu -- for the umpteenth (okay, maybe just the "several-th") time, we decided to make our own a few weeks ago. We used the "marinate for several hours, not two days" recipe from epicurious.com and were disappointed for many reasons: the marinade didn't permeate the fish, the thin coating puddled on the foil & caramelized there instead of caramelizing on the fish; a be-aproned server didn't bring it to us while we enjoyed a beachy vibe... SO! When I saw your post with the genius "Make It Thick To Make It Stick" idea I DID become the Richard Blais of my glaze and we couldn't have been happier with it! The flavor was terrific, the thicker glaze adhered, the fish was supple and lovely (only $16/# at Bristol Farms!) and...dang it, no be-aproned server brought it to us, but we can probably get over that. Maybe.

Carissa Ritchey said...

After having Miso Black Cod at David LeFevre's Fishing with Dynamite here in Manhattan Beach -- not Nobu -- for the umpteenth (okay, maybe just the "several-th") time, we decided to make our own a few weeks ago. We used the "marinate for several hours, not two days" recipe from epicurious.com and were disappointed for many reasons: the marinade didn't permeate the fish, the thin coating puddled on the foil & caramelized there instead of caramelizing on the fish; a be-aproned server didn't bring it to us while we enjoyed a beachy vibe... SO! When I saw your post with the genius "Make It Thick To Make It Stick" idea I DID become the Richard Blais of my glaze and we couldn't have been happier with it! The flavor was terrific, the thicker glaze adhered, the fish was supple and lovely (only $16/# at Bristol Farms!) and...dang it, no be-aproned server brought it to us, but we can probably get over that. Maybe.

Jiffy said...

Slim Jim fried rice

Andria said...

OMG Chef John! Just made this and it's so delicious ! I bought the whole black cod from Costco so i have the bone in. No matter!The meat just flakes and falls off the bone. It's so tender and juicy. I LOVE IT!! It's also so very easy to make! I still have lots of cod left and i will be making it again and again and again...thanks so much !!

Scion said...

for A. Ali - whether you know it or not, you consume minute quantities of alcohol all the time - fermentation takes place!

Setting that micro-level event aside - during cooking, alcohol boils off very quickly - what you are left with are the tastes of the wine etc., not anything you'd get drunk on. Alcohols - there are many kinds - all have a flash-point and boiling point much lower than water.