Monday, November 11, 2013

How to Peel Garlic Like a Boss…Like an Actual Boss

People throw the term “like a boss” around very casually these days, but when I say this technique shows how to peel garlic like a boss, it’s meant literally. I was channel surfing a while back, and saw Martha Stewart demo this very cool trick, and she is, in every sense of the word, a boss.

Many people have inspired me along this entrepreneurial journey online, and Martha is definitely one of them. By the way, I hope she doesn’t take exception to my prison shank joke; but since we are friends (and by friends I mean we’ve never spoken, but do follow each other on Twitter), I’m sure she’ll be fine with it. All kidding aside, this trick is no joke.

The great thing about this method, besides the speed and ease, is that you are truly peeling the garlic, and not crushing it. A crushed garlic clove produces a stronger flavor than a peeled one, especially when used raw, and so this is perfect when you need to mince or slice whole, undamaged cloves. I hope you give this easy trick a try soon. Enjoy!

29 comments:

cookinmom said...

Man...this will come in handy when I make mojo for my Masitas de Puerco! I only need 12 garlic cloves and sometimes I double the recipe because of the holidays! So gracias my friend!

Monica said...

Where and how do you store them as most recipes do not cal for that many?

Joe Sixpack said...

I just watched this video had to try it out worked great now I have a problem what to do with all these peeled garlic any tips how to store them now that their peeled

Chef John said...

I'd use all, or only shake what you need, as peeled garlic doesn't last long and will start to smell strong in the fridge!

Chef John said...

I guess it would have helped to mention that. :)

Chris K. said...

This is one of those techniques that make you want all that wasted time back.

Have you seen Martha Stewart's new chicken recipe? You simmer a whole chicken for 6-8 hours, then dump the stock!

*rim shot*

S/V Blondie-Dog said...

Greetings Chef! This technique is way too cool. Too bad I didn't know about it when I cooked up the Twenty Clove Garlic Chicken recipe that you posted up a while back. And I'm betting that my finicky lady-friend will be most favorably impressed when I'm done shakin' 'dem garlic cloves.
Thanks! You be da' best!

Unknown said...

I was in India recently taking a cooking class, and the teacher was mentioning how the hardest part of the prep for the class was peeling all the garlic. In an attempt to help, I told her about this technique to which she replied, "no it doesn't work." Having used it myself many times at home, I thought I'd try anyway. After shaking the hell out of those bowls again and again, not as single clove ever peeled. So, if you ever find yourself in India, this technique doesn't work with the garlic grown there. However, for the rest of you, this is an AWESOME tip. Thanks for sharing Chef John!

carpediem said...

I love this trick. As far as storing the cloves goes, you can store them in an airtight container submerged in any cooking oil & keep in the fridge.

BBQChick said...

To store them, i put a bamboo skewer thru the cloves, leave a little room at the top. Then put the skewer in a small sterilized jar, fill it with olive or canola oil, and keep it in the fridge.

Pull the skewer out, take off as many cloves as you need, pop the rest back in the jar.

david kaijser said...

What about makeing a Red Velvet cake?

CWR032 said...

I don't think there's any garlic in a red velvet cake...

Aidann said...

You have no idea how much I wish I would have known this technique, after peeling 20 heads of garlic to make pickled garlic cloves. It took me 5 hours plus. :\ Never again will I waste my time! WOW

Steve Kennedy said...

Probably a touch of Cayenne though!

Rita said...

thank you! this will be so much easier for me when i make the czech garlic soup (česnečka).

The Real Estate Lady said...

Thank you!!! It works!!!! By the way, you don't have to do 20. I only did 3.

The Real Estate Lady said...

Thank You! It Worked!!! For the lady that said you never need 20 in a recipe. You don't have to do 20. I only did 3. Chef John's video would have been to short. He had to do 20.

Jude said...

I would caution against storing peeled raw garlic in oil for extended amounts of time - there is a risk of botulism contamination that way. No poisoning here, just that my sister's BF once thought to have peeled garlic always available, but the garlic he stored spoiled in the fridge. The botulism risk info came up afterwards when looking to find out how to refine the process.

Jeremy Haller said...

did this in culinary school, perhaps mention that it makes a ton of noise and everyone in class will stare at you, just saying chef...

Ray Mullings said...

Where do I send the $200, John? Thanks for the technique.

Phil Sackett said...

This technique looks awesome! I have one question, however. Do you have to use metal bowls, or will pyrex ones work? I don't use metal bowls, and this is not a joke post, just in case it sounded like one. :)

Love your recipes CJ! I use a fair amount of them on a regular basis. I do appreciate all of your hard work.

Phillip said...

This trick has never worked for me. Perhaps it depends on the age or variety of garlic?

Chef John said...

Maybe? It's never not worked for me, so maybe....weak arms? ;)

Basil said...

I know that you didn't event the technique but... this feels a little bit cheaty to post it a few days after you.

http://www.saveur.com/article/techniques/video-how-to-peel-a-garlic-clove

Chef John said...

But that wasn't even the same technique, so I'm not sure what your issue with them would be?

Ed Adams said...

Simply amazing. Thank-you once again for the 1,000,000th time on sharing yet another technique. Who needs culinary school when we have the greatest modern-day cyber instructor in you Chef John. 15 seconds I can peel an entire head of garlic into perfectly peeled cloves. That leaves plenty of time left to practice turning shrooms and making little tomato roses.

Jerry Drzewiecki said...

I may try this method the next time I make my Chicken With 40 Cloves of Garlic. Otherwise, I'll stick with my tube garlic peeler which is a rubber tube that looks like an empty manicotti shell. Works great for small amounts with no arm fatigue and no extra dishes to wash.

gautam said...

Chef, thanks for a wonderful site, and great shows. A lot of thought and hard work, much appreciated.

Indian garlic is a completely different animal from the hard and soft neck garlics we use here. The ones grown in India have tiny cloves, and the so-called single-clove garlic grown in the Himalayas is actually a type of leek.

To deal with quantities of both Indian garlic and ginger, leave to soak in water. Then rub the garlic between your palms, fairly hard and the skins will come off. Your hands will be submerged now & again in the water, sort of alternating between up and in. Bruising does not matter, because these cloves are meant to be stone ground or browned in oil and ground, when they are used in the traditional manner. I am surprised that the cooking teacher did not know the techniques used by quantity cooks.

Ginger is peeled in large quantities in the same way, after a long soak. The skin comes off easily with he back of a knife.

Both garlic and ginger might be coarsely crushed and separately soaked in water without peeling and the infused water used in cooking, especially meats and chicken that are braised-fried in oil, e.g. karhai-style. This lends a delicate and excellent taste, without the thickening and gravy effect caused by the actual presence of garlic and ginger. There is nothing to burn or scorch. You have a clean, oil or oil + butter base that is fragrant with just a very few spices and the flavor of good meat. Just one or two dry spices like cracked peppercorns and red pepper for example, sparingly used. Or, coarsely crushed roasted coriander and lightly toasted red pepper, nothing more. Less is more. Very important to bring out the true karahi taste.

Brian Picklesimer said...

Hey! This is a great technique, but there is room for improvement. Try using a Tupperware bowl with a lid. This way, you need not hold the two bowls together while shaking--a risky proposition for a clumsy person like me!