Thursday, June 7, 2012

Minor T-Bone Mystery Solved!

I received a couple complimentary steaks to try out from



5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hi Chef John, in a past post you said you would in the future post your braised lentils recipe. Hook it up soon! thanks

Maureen said...

I've jotted this information down for use at my next cocktail party. I didn't know the answer either.

Ed Adams said...

Chef,
I'm sure the posting of a simple grilled steak is way below what you would normally do, but I am curious what your grill secrets for the perfect steak are.

Ed

Bill B said...

MMM... Free is my favorite spice!

Danschlag said...

As a butcher, I thought I would leave my two cents. Butchers traditionally cut t-bones and porterhouses at a slight wedge to minimize the amount of meat which goes into the grind. The ends of the short loin sub primal are not parallel, but trapezoidal in shape. Thus, the butcher cuts the t-bones and porterhouses at a slightly increasing angle, rather than flat. This allows the butcher to "make up the break." The result is many slightly wedge-shaped steaks, rather than many flat steaks and one obliquely shaped steaks. Kari Underly illustrates this in her book "The Art of Beef Cutting"