Friday, January 27, 2012

Balsamic Beurre Noir – A Black Butter Sauce Any Femme Fatale Would Love

It’s too bad I didn’t go to film school. If I had, I could have done a clever play on the film noir genre for this balsamic beurre noir recipe. 

Of course, it would have been done in black and white, and featured a chain-smoking, fishnet stocking-clad femme fatale who would eventually double-cross me after a few extended close-ups of spinning ceiling fans. But, I didn’t, so all you get is this plain old video for an incredibly easy and delicious, garlic-spiked, balsamic butter sauce. 

The name is going to confuse a few culinary students out there. Technically, a “beurre noir” refers to a sauce where the butter is cooked until it turns a very dark brown, almost black color. I’m using the term “beurre noir,” as one would use “beurre blanc,” a butter sauce made with reduced white wine, or “beurre rouge,” one made with red wine. The technique is identical for these types of sauces, and we just change the name depending on the color.

For you guys out there looking for Valentine’s Day recipe ideas, you can’t go wrong with this very sexy sauce. Everyone knows cooking dinner for your sweetheart on V-Day is way more romantic than taking her out, and you really can’t beat the old home field advantage for these occasions. You don’t have to hire a private dick to figure that one out.

Anyway, I hope you give this a try soon. Rent some classic film noir, grill up some meat or fish, and spoon over this dark, dangerous, and deeply delicious sauce. Enjoy!



Ingredients for 2-3 portions:
2 tsp melted butter
1 sliced garlic clove
1/3 cup aged balsamic vinegar
1 tsp minced red chilies
1/2 tsp tomato paste
salt and pepper to taste
2 tbsp unsalted butter

28 comments:

Paul in Western North Carolina said...

I've got to stop watching your videos late in the day at work, while hungry. I'm going to the grocery store as soon as I leave work and shopping on an empty stomach is not good!

Another awesome looking dish!

Chris said...

I like sauces like this that can be made quickly during the meat's resting period.

If for some reason you did have to hold this sauce for a while, the best way would be over a bain marie since it's a butter sauce?

suz412 said...

Don't have to hire a private dick???

Anonymous said...

so why should we only buy unsalted butter?

Steve said...

Chef:

You've got to stop spying on me -- I make a similar sauce for duck breast.

But seriously, one word of warning about Balsamic vinegars -- there are a heck of a lot of fake ones out there, so beware. A lot of them are just plain cider vinegar or something like that with caramel coloring. Be sure to check the ingredient list.

I once dropped over $70 on a bottle of fake stuff at a fancy "gourmet" shop in Palm Desert. An expensive lesson learned.

Final note regarding salted butter. Two words: English muffins. Just sayin'. Your mileage may, of course, vary.

Anonymous said...

Hi chef john. Can I store this in the fridge ? how long does it last?

Mary F said...

chef john. I dont like balsamic vinegar, can i use malt vineger?

Chef John said...

Not sure what it would taste like, but u can use anything u want!

Chef John said...

No idea, but a long time.

Me.Eat.Food said...

LOL..."home field advantage." Oui, oui mademoiselle!

Juice said...

What a great looking recipe. I can already taste it. I'll be fixing this tomorrow!

Unknown said...

Chef John. Would it be a problem to use asian sambal sauce in place of the fresh red chili peppers? I'm eager to give this recipe a try. Thanks

Chef John said...

of course!! enjoy!

Matías Guzmán said...

Fucking awesome, could you do Sauce Robert pretty pleaaaaase? Thank you!!!

stevefrommontana said...

The freakishly small wooden spoon. I've missed you so!

Mary F said...

Chef John, now I don't like malt vinegar either.

axel14222 said...

So, just to clarify (no pun intended), "butter" always means "unsalted butter" in your recipes, chef?

Chef John said...

yes! you can add salt, but you can't extract salt. plus, better butter.

SouthMex said...

Chef John.... thought I'd give it a whirl, used an aged balsamic vinegar from Modena, mixed it with "unsalted butter" at low heat, and WTF.... like oil and water! Stirred while reducing and could not get the consistent sauce thing going....que paso? Cheap Vinegar maybe? Bad Butter?

Chef John said...

Butter melted too quickly You don't mix in the butter on low heat, you turn the heat off. See video again.

1Bigg_ER said...

Is it just me or your tspn/ tbspn amounts are larger in videos? That did not look like a tspn of tomato paste.

Chef John said...

It's just you ;) The ing. list says 1/2 tsp of tom paste, and that's what I added.

Ben S said...

I just made a red wine sauce that keeps well in the freezer, and i reheat it in the pan just before use, would that work with this butter too? I'm asking because I too, hate UCBS, and wouldn't want this to separate.

Thanks, as always, love your recipes!

1Bigg_ER said...

No, I insist, but then again a camera adds half a tspn.

Chef John said...

Sorry, don't really know about butter sauces you can freeze and simply reheat. There are ways, but more involved than I can explain in a comment. I'll have to demo sometime.

Abstract Invader said...

This recipe was fantastic! I found it this morning while searching for inspiration, and served it on some lovely rib-eye steaks with some grilled asparagus and nugget potatoes with mint.

Did not quite achieve that glossy consistency you were talking about, but the flavour was definitely there, and my folks were raving about it.

Now let's see if it was good enough for them to do the dishes...

Jon S said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jon S said...

Looks amazing! Would there be any problem with making this in the same pan that I just roasted, say, a pork tenderloin in?